Love your vids — and reviews — interested in your opinion here. We already described the tone as quite rich and full, but it is the loudness factor that stands out a bit above the rest. Visually, this design feature is striking, as the sweeping lines of the shaped laminate catch the eye. Costs were lowered due, in part, to production being moved to Martin’s Mexican facility, the use of HPL for the back and sides as well as an ultra-simple spec. Speak Your Mind Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. So how does it all sound then?

As odd and contradictive as it might sound, this is a top-notch cheap high-end guitar. To put the DRS1 through its paces I first tried some basic bluegrass runs and Carter-style strumming, and the guitar responded with an agreeable bark. That said, the package as a whole works very well and, again, for the cost, you’re getting a lot of guitar for your money. The guitar is able to cut through any mix both in unplugged and plugged-in regime, as any Martin ought to. One credible option is sapele; a durable wood native to tropical Africa, historically used in flooring due to its attractive grain. With its commanding voice, the dreadnought is at home in many styles of music, from bluegrass to folk to unplugged rock and beyond, and its silhouette has become the blueprint for the standard steel-string acoustic. Powered by a nine-volt battery, the Sonitone preamp is easy to operate, with just two rotary controls: Plugged in, the DRS1 has a bright, vibrant tone that, when pushed, becomes a little brittle.

The tone control doesn’t have a significant effect on the output, but it does just enough to tame enthusiastic strumming. In some ways, the DRS1 resembles the highly popular, though equally understated DM, although sapele has more of a brown than orange hue.

White Corian is used for the nut, while bone-substitute Tusq is employed to form the compensated saddle. So how does it all sound then? Speak Your Mind Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Martin DRS1 Review

To help you with that, the company included a free hard-shell case in the price. Although the DRS1 is a noticeably bottom-heavy guitar, it remains a comfortable one to play. Martin is a legendary guitar company known for exceptional sound quality and high-end prices, but if you dig deep enough, you will be able to find that sonic excellence at a bit more of an affordable price.

Well, actually, that’s not technically correct. As odd and contradictive as it might sound, this is a top-notch cheap rfview guitar. Every joint is super tight, every line clean and crisp.

Solid sapele top, back, and sides. It has a top-quality build and a fine sound to match. This tonewood combo secures an impeccable, unique, warm and marton sound with impeccable intonation and sonic accuracy. It’s also widely used by Martin’s closest competitor, Taylor. Also included in the mix is a black richlite bridge with a white tusq saddle, white corian nut, and a classic black pick-guard.

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Martin DRS1 review

The guitar is able to cut through any mix both in unplugged and plugged-in regime, as any Martin ought to. When I got into some common tunings, open G and D A D G A D, and strummed open-string chords and natural harmonics, the guitar rveiew shimmering and resonant, with no loss of richness in the bass. We already ddrs1 the tone as quite rich and full, msrtin it is the loudness factor that stands out a bit above the rest. The DRS1 boasts the low-cost Fishman Sonitone preamp system, which features a soundhole-mounted preamp with rotary controls for volume and tone located just inside the bass side of the soundhole.

The action is nice and low, and it was easy to play open and barre chords up and down the neck, as well as brisk single-note lines in all registers.

The top, back, and sides of the DRS1 are made of solid sapele, while the neck is Stratabond—white birch that is dyed and laminated into large blocks before being carved, a process intended to increase strength and stability. While the Sonitone offers little in the way of tonal shaping, I found the sound to be just right when I set the tone control to a neutral position and plugged into a Fender Esries amp. Overall the DRS1 has a responsive, dynamic projection too.

Plugged doad, the DRS1 has a bright, vibrant tone that, when pushed, becomes a little brittle. With its snappy bass, ample midrange, and crystalline treble, it is excellently balanced, and the sapele seems to add a hint of sweetness to the sound.

Your email address will not be published. With its commanding voice, the dreadnought is at home in many styles of music, from bluegrass to folk to unplugged rock and beyond, and its silhouette has become the blueprint for the standard steel-string acoustic.

Certainly the body is constructed from solid sapele – thus most would describe it as an all-solid guitar – but the DRS1’s neck is constructed from a multi-laminate named Stratabond.

Powered by a nine-volt battery, the Sonitone preamp is easy to operate, with just two rotary controls: In practice, an angled bridgeplate creates a ‘box’ under the bridge and this design adds strength to the top. As long as you are after a top-level acoustic-electric guitar, this one is a choice you cannot regret making.

Premium Martin guitars have long been made with spruce tops and rosewood bodies, while less expensive ones have toad constructed of mahogany. But as mahogany has become threatened, some guitar makers are turning to sapele, a durable, attractively grained wood native to Africa. To put the DRS1 through its paces I first tried some basic bluegrass runs and Carter-style strumming, and the guitar responded with an agreeable bark.

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Pros Looks, voice, build quality, price. As impressive as the DRS1 is visually and in terms of its presentation, nothing prepares you for the boisterous, lively tone. Further evidence of Martin’s responsible approach is found in the use of sapele for the DRS1’s unbound body. Despite being strong, the guitar is still super expressive and responsive, allowing you to deliver every single sonic nuance of your performing and strumming style. We took it out roac a bit of a spin, conclusions patiently await below.

A little piece of luxury might be offered by the slice of Indian rosewood fitted to the face of the headstock… it is in roadd high-pressure laminate HPL. As with the fourth generation of Performing Artist guitars, black Richlite – a composite resembling ebony made from recycled paper and resin – has been used for the fingerboard and bridge. For more acoustic electric guitars, click here.

While not quite the cannon in terms of volume that some more-expensive Martins are, the DRS1 has decent headroom and projection, to say nothing of a bit of the warmth that is typical of many guitars using mahogany or similar woods for their tops.

In truth, the Fishman system fitted is entry-level and it does little more than simply offer a usable amplified output. One credible option is sapele; a durable wood native to tropical Africa, historically used in flooring due to its attractive grain.

In the electronic section, the six-string utilizes a basic Fishman pickup and Fishman Sonitone electronics. Costs drs lowered due, in part, to production being moved to Martin’s Mexican facility, the use of HPL for the back and sides as well as an ultra-simple spec.

Martin DRS1 Review – Acoustic Guitar

Regardless of sonic environment, this six-string will always sound stronger and fuller than dr1s peers, and we believe that this trait makes the DRS1 far more valuable and efficient for modern production values and approach.

This process reportedly increases rigidity and stability – qualities crucial for a guitar’s neck. Well, very good and absolutely worthy of the Martin name. Of particular note are the stirring articulate mids, which offer a likeable tone for fingerstyle, hybrid picking and flatpicking alike.